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About the Team

Carolina P. Amador-Moreno

Carolina P. Amador-Moreno

Carolina P. Amador-Moreno is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Bergen. Between 2002 and 2020 she held different positions at the department of Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Limerick, the English Department at University College Dublin, and the English Department at the University of Extremadura, where she was Director of the Research Institute for Linguistics and Applied Languages (LINGLAP). Her research interests centre on the English spoken in Ireland and include stylistics, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, sociolinguistics, and pragmatics. Her publications include, among others, Orality in written texts: Using historical corpora to investigate Irish English (1700-1900) (2019); An Introduction to Irish English (2010); the co-edited volumes Irish Identities: Sociolinguistic Perspectives (2020); Voice and Discourse in the Irish Context (2017); and Pragmatic Markers in Irish English (2015). She has been involved in different research projects, at local, national and international level. Together with Kevin McCafferty, she has worked on the compilation and study of CORIECOR (Corpus of Irish English Correspondence). In 2020 she secured funding for the creation of CORVIZ, which makes CORIECOR available to the wider research community.


Nancy E. Ávila-Ledesma

Nancy E. Ávila-Ledesma

Nancy E. Ávila-Ledesma is lecturer in the Department of English Studies at the University of Extremadura. Her research interests and publications centre on pragmatics and corpus linguistics, historical sociolinguistics, emotions and Irish migration studies. She has co-written and published chapters in the volumes Intra-Writer Variation in Historical Sociolinguistics, Peter Lang (forthcoming); Expanding the Landscapes of Irish English Research, Routledge (in press); Irish Identities: Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Mouton de Gruyter (2020); the Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics: Global Implications for Society and Education in the Networked Age, Springer (2016) and Pragmemes and Theories of Language Use, Springer (2016). Her book A Corpus-Pragmatic Analysis of Irish Emigrants’ Letters will be published in 2023 by Palgrave Macmillan. She is a member of the Spanish Association for Irish Studies (AEDEI), the Irish English Research Network and the Research Institute for Linguistics and Applied Languages (LINGLAP) at the University of Extremadura. She received her Ph.D. in English Linguistics from the Autonomous University of Madrid in 2019.


Karen Corrigan

Karen Corrigan

Karen Corrigan is Professor of Linguistics and English Language at Newcastle University where she acts as Director of Research in Linguistics. Her research interests range from acquisition, bilingualism and contact to sociolinguistics. She has particular expertise in the languages and dialects of Ireland, leading to the publication of Irish English, Volume 1: Northern Ireland (2010) and Linguistic Communities and Migratory Processes: Newcomers Acquiring Sociolinguistics Variation in Northern Ireland (2020). The latter evolved from UKRI funding for projects exploring language, migration and identity in Northern Ireland from synchronic and diachronic perspectives. Corrigan’s interests in corpus linguistics and the development of regional spoken corpora has led to her co-editing the three volumes in Palgrave-Macmillan’s Creating and Digitizing Language Corpora series. Since the late 1990s, she has led projects to develop legacy corpora like CORVIZ for use by academics and wider publics. They include the Diachronic Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English and the Talk of the Toon.


María F. García-Bermejo Giner

María F. García-Bermejo Giner

María F. García-Bermejo Giner is Associate Professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Salamanca. She obtained an MA in English Language and Literature from the University of Salamanca and a PhD in English Linguistics in 1989, with a dissertation supervised by Gudelia Rodríguez that studied the dialects of the West Midlands as represented in the novels of George Eliot. She has been Associate Professor in English Linguistics at the University of Salamanca since 1992, where she teaches undergraduate and MA courses on the history of the English language and English diachronic dialectology. Her main areas of research are dialect literature and literary dialects as a source for dialectology, as well as the history of the English language and corpus linguistics.


Kevin McCafferty

Kevin McCafferty

Kevin McCafferty is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Bergen, where he currently acts as Head of the Foreign Languages Department. His research interests range from English language and linguistics, Irish English, Historical Sociolinguistics, Language Contact, to Language variation and change. He is the author of Ethnicity and Language Change, English in (London)Derry, Northern Ireland (John Benjamins 2021). He was the PI of the CONVAR project, which was funded by the Norwegian Research Council (RCN grant 213245) from 2012–16, with Amador-Moreno as the main international partner. This project led on to the compilation of CORIECOR, which has resulted in a continuing steady stream of research papers, publications, MA and PhD theses since 2010 (see Publications section).


Javier Ruano García

Javier Ruano García

Javier Ruano-García is Associate Professor of the History of the English Language at the University of Salamanca (Spain). His main research interests lie in the fields of historical language variation, with a focus on regional dialects of the early and late modern English periods, historical sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics and historical dialect lexicography. He is the author of Early Modern Northern English Lexis: A Literary Corpus- Based Study (Peter Lang, 2010) and has edited White Kennett’s Etymological Collections of English Words and Provincial Expressions for Oxford University Press (2018). He has been involved in the compilation of the Salamanca Corpus for the past ten years, taking care of specimens representative of the Lancashire dialect and other varieties of northern English. He is particularly interested in how literary representations of regional speech testify and contribute to processes of dialect enregisterment, which he will explore now in relation to the evidence furnished by CORIECOR.


Karen Corrigan

Pilar Sánchez-García

Pilar Sánchez-García obtained an MA in English Language and Literature from the University of Salamanca and a PhD in English Linguistics in 2000, with a dissertation on the literary representation of Northern English dialects during the nineteenth century. She has taught in the Department of English Philology in Salamanca since 1994, where she works as Associate Professor since 2015. She teaches undergraduate and MA courses on the history of the English language, linguistic variation in literary texts, and English diachronic dialectology. She is a member of the research group, DING (English Dialectology and the History of the English Language) at the University of Salamanca. She worked on the start-up of The Salamanca Corpus: Digital Archive of English Dialect Texts in 2011 and has been involved since then on its compilation. Her research interests are language variation, dialect writing, corpus linguistics.