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Publications

Books

  • Amador-Moreno, C.P. (2019) Orality in written texts: Using historical corpora to investigate Irish English (1700-1900). London and New York: Routledge.
  • Amador-Moreno, C.P. (2010) An Introduction to Irish English. London: Equinox.
  • Corrigan, K. P. (2020). Linguistic Communities and Migratory Processes. Newcomers Acquiring Sociolinguistic Variation in Northern Ireland. DOI: 10.1515/9783110614190

Edited volumes

  • Hickey, R. (ed.) (2019). Keeping in Touch. Emigrant Letters across the English-speaking World. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Book chapters

  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. and Kevin McCafferty. Under Review. Emigrant letters (and other ego-documents) from Ireland. In Hickey, R. (ed) Oxford Handbook of Irish English. Oxford: OUP.
  • Amador-Moreno, C.P., Under review. Discourse Markers in Irish English. In Hickey, R. (ed) Oxford Handbook of Irish English. Oxford: OUP.
  • Amador Moreno, C. P. (2020). ‘Matt & Mrs Connor is with me now. They are only beginning to learn the work of the camp’: Irish emigrants writing from Argentina. In R. Hickey (ed.) Keeping in Touch: Familiar Letters across the English-speaking World. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. and Ávila Ledesma, N. (2020). ‘Migration experiences and identity construction in nineteenth-century Irish emigrant letters’. In: R. Hickey and C.P. Amador-Moreno (eds.) Irish Identities: Sociolinguistic Perspectives. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9781501507687-013
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. and McCafferty, K. (2015). ‘[B]ut sure its only a penny after all’: Irish English discourse marker sure. In M. Dossena (ed.) Transatlantic perspectives in Late Modern English. Advances in Historical Sociolinguistics. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 179-198.
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. and McCafferty, K. (2015). ‘Sure this is a great country for drink and rowing at elections”: Discourse markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence, 1750 – 1940. In C. P. Amador Moreno, K. McCafferty and E. Vaughan (eds.) Pragmatic Markers in Irish English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 270-291.
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P., Ávila Ledesma, N. and Corrigan, K. P. (2021).  “You are some foreigner – you are not even from this country: Comparative Perspectives on Historical and Contemporary Diasporas in an Irish Context”. In C. P. Amador Moreno and S. Lucek (eds.). Expanding the Landscape of Irish English Research: Papers in Honour of Jeffrey Kallen. London and New York: Routledge. 9780367856397 (HB), 9781003025078 (EB).
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P., Corrigan, K. P., McCafferty, K. and Moreton, E. (2016). Migration Databases as Impact Tools in the Education and Heritage Sectors. In K. P. Corrigan and A. Mearns (eds.) Creating and Digitizing Language Corpora.  Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 25-67.
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. (2010). Writing from the margins: Donegal English invented/imagined. Forum for Research on the Languages of Scotland and Ulster, vol. 1 (special issue: 'Marginal dialects': language varieties on linguistic boundaries in Scotland, Ireland and beyond), 52-69. http://www.abdn.ac.uk/pfrlsu/
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. (2012). The Irish in Argentina: Irish English transported. In B. Migge and M. Ní Chiosain (eds.) New Perspectives in Irish English Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 289-309.
  • Amador-Moreno, C.P., Ávila-Ledesma, N. E. and Corrigan, K. P. (2021) ‘You are some foreigner – you are not even from this country’: Comparative Perspectives on Historical and Contemporary Diasporas in an Irish Context. In Lucek, Stephen and Carolina P. Amador-Moreno, Expanding the Landscapes of Irish English Research: Papers in Honour of Jeffrey Kallen. Routledge Studies in Sociolinguistics Series.
  • Ávila Ledesma, N. and Amador Moreno, C. P. (2020). Forthcoming. ‘The seas was like mountains’: Intra-writer variation and social mobility in Irish emigrants letters. In M. Schiegg and J. Huber (eds.), Intra-Writer Variation in Historical Sociolinguistics. (Historical Sociolinguistics. Studies on Language and Society in the Past). Bern: Peter Lang.
  • Ávila Ledesma, N. and Amador Moreno, C.P. (2016). “The more please [places] I see the more I think of home”: On gendered discourse of Irishness and migration experiences. Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics. Springer International Publishing Switzerland. ISBN: 978-3-319-41732-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41733-2_5
  • Bonness, D. J. (2019). '"[S]eas may divide and oceans roll between but friends is friends whatever intervene": Emigrant letters in New Zealand'. In: R. Hickey (ed.) Keeping in Touch: Emigrant Letters Across the English-speaking World. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 185-209.
  • Bonness, D. J. (2018). 'NEG/AUX contraction in eighteenth-century Irish English emigrant letters'. In: D. Villanueva Romero, C. P. Amador Moreno and M. Sánchez García (eds.). Voice and Discourse in the Irish Context. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 105-137.
  • De Rijke, P.M. (2018). ‘I Intend to Try Some Other Part of the Worald’: Evidence of Schwa-Epenthesis in the Historical Letters of Irish Emigrants. In: Villanueva-Romero, Diana, C. P. Amador-Moreno and Manuel Sánchez García (eds.) Voice and Discourse in the Irish Context. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • McCafferty, K. and Amador-Moreno, C. P. (2012). ‘I will be expecting a letter from you before this reaches you’. A corpus-based study of shall/will variation in Irish English correspondence. In M. Dossena (ed.), Letter writing in Late Modern Europe. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 179-204.
  • McCafferty, K. and Amador-Moreno, C. P. (2019). ‘but a[h] Hellen d[ea]r sure you have it more in your power in every respect than I have’. Discourse marker sure in Irish English. In: S. Jansen and L. Siebers (eds.) Processes of Change: Studies in Late Modern and Present-Day English - Studies in Language Variation, vol. 21. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • McCafferty, K. and Amador-Moreno, C.P. (2012). CORIECOR – A Corpus of Irish English Correspondence, c. 1700-1900. Compiling and using a diachronic corpus to study the evolution of Irish English. In B. Migge and M. Ní Chiosain (eds.) New Perspectives in Irish English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 265-288.
  • Romero Trillo, J. and Ávila Ledesma, N. (2016). The ethnopragmatic representation of positive and negative emotions in Irish immigrants’ letters. Pragmemes and Theories of Language Use. Dordrecht: Springer. ISBN: 978-3-319-43490-2. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-43491-9_21

Journal articles

  • Amador Moreno, C. P. and McCafferty, K. (2012). Linguistic identity and the study of Emigrant Letters: Irish English in the making. In: Lengua y Migración, 5-24.
  • Amador-Moreno, C. P. (2016). ‘Female voices in the context of Irish emigration: A linguistic analysis of gender differences in private correspondence’. In: Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies: Vol. 16 (1), 77-95. http://arrow.dit.ie/ijass/vol16/iss1/5
  • Ávila Ledesma, N. (2019). “Believe my word dear father that you can’t pick up money here as quick as the people at home thinks it”: Exploring migration experiences in Irish emigrants’ letters. Corpus Pragmatics: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 3 (2): 101-121. ISSN 2509-9507. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41701-018-00051-8
  • Ávila Ledesma, N. and Amador Moreno, C. P. (2016). “The More Please [Places] I See the More I Think of Home”: On gendered discourse of Irishness and migration experiences. In: J. Romero Trillo (ed.) Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics. Global Implications for Society and Education in the Networked Age, 85-105.
  • Bonness, D. J. (2015). '"How is her eyes [?] are they still closed [?]": Subject-verb agreement in nineteenth-century Irish English', In: Token: A Journal of English Linguistics, 4, 5-36.
  • Bonness, D. J. (2017). 'The Northern subject rule in the Irish diaspora: Subject-verb agreement among first-and second-generation emigrants to New Zealand', in: English World-Wide, 38.2, 125-152.
  • McCafferty, K. and Amador Moreno, C.P. (2014). ‘If you write soon I shall get it & will reply at once’. The spread of first-person future will in Irish English. In: English Language and Linguistics, 18, 407-429.
  • Van Hattum, M. (2014). ‘CAN and BE ABLE TO in nineteenth-century Irish English: A case of 'imperfect learning'?’, In: K. Davidse, C. Gentens, L. Ghesquière and L. Vandelanotte (eds.) Corpus Interrogation and Grammatical Patterns: Studies in Corpus Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, Vol. 63, 105-128.
  • Van Hattum, M. (2015). ‘May and might in nineteenth century Irish English and English English’, In: P. Collins (ed.) Grammatical Change in English World-Wide: Studies in Corpus Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, vol. 67, 221-246.
  • Van Hattum, M., (2019). ‘Home and Away: Dialect divergence in nineteenth-century Irish English emigrant writing’ In: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, 9-37.

PhD theses

  • De Rijke, P.M. (2016). '[S]ince we came across the Atalantic:' An empirical diachronic study of Northern Irish English phonology. Unpublished doctoral thesis. University of Bergen.
  • Van Hattum, M. (2012). ‘Irish English modal verbs from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries’. Supervisors: D. Denison and N. Yanez Bouza.